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Welcome to STop, the Seattle Times Opinion blog where our editorial writers and editors share their evolving thoughts on a variety of issues. STop is a place where opinion writers and readers can exchange views and readers can learn more about how editorial positions are formed.

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November 07, 2005

Alito and the Notification Law

Judge Samuel Alito is criticized by pro-abortion activists for having written in favor of a law requiring married women to notify their husbands before having an abortion. I note that according to the Pew Center, here, Americans favor such a law. Even most Democrats favor it. So Alito is hardly "right-wing" in voting to allow it.

Other thoughts: First, the law, which was struck down (Alito being in the minority) required only notification, not permission. And it had loopholes for the cases of husbands who could not be found, or who were abusive. I don't know if such a law would do much good, but it is an attempt to get at a legitimate issue: an unborn child is the creation of two parents, not one.

The second thought is that all this argument is about policy--;about whether it is good to have a notification law. What Alito was trying to decide was whether it is constitutional to have a notification law. That's a whole different question. "Constitutional" does not mean "good;" it simply means "allowed."

Respond to Bruce.

 
Posted by Bruce Ramsey at November 7, 2005 01:22 PM



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