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Welcome to STop, the Seattle Times Opinion blog where our editorial writers and editors share their evolving thoughts on a variety of issues. STop is a place where opinion writers and readers can exchange views and readers can learn more about how editorial positions are formed.

The opinions you read below are those of the individual writers, not necessarily views that will become formal positions of The Seattle Times. Respond to STop
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Jim Vesely
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Jim Vesely
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Lee Moriwaki
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Lee Moriwaki
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Joni Balter
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Eric Devericks
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Lance Dickie
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Lance Dickie
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Bruce Ramsey
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Bruce Ramsey
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Kate Riley
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Kate Riley
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Lynne Varner
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Lynne Varner
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Ryan Blethen
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Ryan Blethen
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September 26, 2005

Abortion after Roe

A reader responds to my previous blog saying that if Roe v. Wade were overruled, states might not follow public sentiment on the abortion question, and, moreover, the federal government might step in and preempt them. He writes:

If there is no right to an abortion, there is nothing to prevent the Congress from enacting abortion bans under the commerce clause that pre-empt state laws allowing abortion. Given the current dominance of Congress by Republicans, this is a strong possibility. While initially the regulation of abortion would be returned to the states, it wouldn't necessarily stay there.

That's conceivable. While it seems crazy that abortion could ever be considered "interstate commerce," since the 1930s just about everything else has been. Probably the fear of having the law thrown out as unconstitutional wouldn't stop many in Congress. I still think the opinion polls might slow them down, particularly swing-district Republicans.

Respond to Bruce.

 
Posted by Bruce Ramsey at September 26, 2005 05:01 PM



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