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May 09, 2005

The fast starters

Several hundred middle-school students from the Puget Sound area won awards in theJohns Hopkins University Talent Search for high scores on the Scholastic Aptitude Test. This is the test given to high school seniors, and it was not required that seventh and eighth-graders take it. These are kids who had grades high enough to be asked to take the test, who had parents who wanted them to take it, who did take it, and who scored high.

At the awards ceremony Sunday they had a list of all the winners. The ethnic dispersion was wide. The first girl awarded was African American. There were East Indian names, Jewish names, and varous other European surnames. The strongest showing was by Asians. By my count there were:

9 named Wang or Wong (same name in Chinese)

6 named Lee or Li (same in Chinese, though “Lee” is also English)

4 Kim

4 Nelson

2 Smith

1 Jones

That was the SAT, which has verbal and math. There was another list of the SET Mathematics Awards, which were students under 13 who scored 700-800 on the math SAT. This was a list from the entire United States. It had:

14 Lee or Li

10 Wang or Wong

9 Zhang or Zheng

8 Xu or Xue

6 Wu

5 Chen

5 Huang

4 Kim, and one each of Smith, Jones, Olson, Gordon, Hughes, Miller, Nelson. (Nelson was from Washington). Also one each of Armaneous, Barshteyn, Choquette, Dwivedi, Enache, Fidaleo, Gupta, Hazi, Ivanov, Ji, Kopczynski, Laniyonu, Mao, Nagao, Ou, Patil, Quek, Rayala, Sokolskaya, Tyutyunik, Ueki, Vijay, Wei, Xie, Ye and Zehender.

There were two much shorter lists of first-place (rather than merely high) SAT scores for seventh and eighth grades. These were nationwide lists.

For seventh grade only 19 names made this list. Named were the student and the school. Three were homeschooled. Two of the 19 were from here: Jessie Gong, Einstein Middle School, Shoreline, and Lawrence Xing, Lakeside School, Seattle.

For eighth grade there were 36 names nationwide, four from here: Rich An, Washington Middle School, Seattle; Timothy Firman, Lakeside School; Ashoat Tevosyan, Kamiakin Junior High School, Kirkland; and Sophie Arlow, the Overlake School.

Congratulations.

Respond to Bruce.

 
Posted by Bruce Ramsey at May 9, 2005 11:03 AM



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