Link to jump to start of content The Seattle Times Company Jobs Autos Homes Rentals NWsource Classifieds seattletimes.com
The Seattle Times STOP: The Seattle Times Opinion Blog
Traffic | Weather | Your account Movies | Restaurants | Today's events



Welcome to STop, the Seattle Times Opinion blog where our editorial writers and editors share their evolving thoughts on a variety of issues. STop is a place where opinion writers and readers can exchange views and readers can learn more about how editorial positions are formed.

The opinions you read below are those of the individual writers, not necessarily views that will become formal positions of The Seattle Times. Respond to STop
(Please be aware that your name and comments may be published here, unless you specify otherwise).

Currently, STop cannot automatically post readers' comments on the blog. However, the editorial staff will regularly post readers' comments. Your comments are sent directly to the individual editor or writer.

space space space

Jim Vesely
space
Jim Vesely
E-mail | Bio


Lee Moriwaki
space
Lee Moriwaki
E-mail | Bio


Joni Balter
space
Joni Balter
E-mail | Bio


Eric Devericks
space
Eric Devericks
E-mail | Bio


Lance Dickie
space
Lance Dickie
E-mail | Bio


Bruce Ramsey
space
Bruce Ramsey
E-mail | Bio


Kate Riley
space
Kate Riley
E-mail | Bio


Lynne Varner
space
Lynne Varner
E-mail | Bio


Ryan Blethen
space
Ryan Blethen
E-mail | Bio


May 03, 2005

Insensitivity, or a Civil Rights case?

“Woman wins bias case over service dog,” was the headline on a story on B1 today. The story was about Joyce Fischer-Jones, who took a dog into a convenience store. The proprietor grabbed at her, she said, and demanded that she take the dog outside. She said she tried to explain that she needed this dog because she had panic attacks and agoraphobia, but that the proprietor wouldn’t listen. So she filed a complaint with the Seattle Office for Civil Rights, and won a judgment of $21,222. Moral of the story: Not all service dogs are for the deaf or blind.

The story is told from woman's point of view. The story says the proprietor, Ho Park, could not be reached for comment.

The proprietor’s name suggests that he is Korean, and probably an immigrant. Probably he has seen a good deal of fake IDs, shoplifting, misbehavior and unconvincing excuses. Very likely he had never heard of any such thing as a guide dog for the agoraphobic or chronically panic-stricken.

Very likely $22,000 is a lot of money for him. In my view, making him pay that much for what he did is overkill. A simple talking-to by a cop or some official should have solved it.

Respond to Bruce.

 
Posted by Bruce Ramsey at May 3, 2005 04:34 PM



Marketplace

November 2005

S M T W T F S
    1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30