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Welcome to STop, the Seattle Times Opinion blog where our editorial writers and editors share their evolving thoughts on a variety of issues. STop is a place where opinion writers and readers can exchange views and readers can learn more about how editorial positions are formed.

The opinions you read below are those of the individual writers, not necessarily views that will become formal positions of The Seattle Times. Respond to STop
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Jim Vesely
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Jim Vesely
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Lee Moriwaki
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Lee Moriwaki
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Joni Balter
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Joni Balter
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Eric Devericks
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Eric Devericks
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Lance Dickie
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Lance Dickie
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Bruce Ramsey
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Bruce Ramsey
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Kate Riley
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Kate Riley
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Lynne Varner
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Lynne Varner
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Ryan Blethen
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Ryan Blethen
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April 29, 2005

Diversity--and also standards

A habitual reader takes me to task for advocating positions the reader saw as stark contradictions. The reader correctly notes that in my column, "Being Open to Equity and Equality," I cheer recognition of multiple forms of intelligence and talent as a way of diversifying public school gifted programs.

The next day, the lead editorial on our page cheered the increased flexibility of the No Child Left Behind law. The reader correctly notes that as a member of the Seattle Times Editorial Board, I had a hand in that editorial.

But, there is no contradiction in advocating for better recognition of minority student achievement and for the federal law that has the best chance of getting us there. The heart of No Child Left Behind is its unapologetic demand that states educate minority students to the same high standards used for white students. The federal law smartly requires academic achievement to be disaggregated by race to ensure dismal results aren't hidden in large statewide averages.

The reader wants me to reject NCLB because after all there is "open revolt against the law" with Utah and California among the loudest. Yes, and there was open revolt when Brown vs. Board of Education widened access to quality public schools. Our government didn't back down then. Don't count on it backing down now.

Respond to Lynne.

 
Posted by Lynne Varner at April 29, 2005 04:28 PM



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