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Welcome to STop, the Seattle Times Opinion blog where our editorial writers and editors share their evolving thoughts on a variety of issues. STop is a place where opinion writers and readers can exchange views and readers can learn more about how editorial positions are formed.

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Jim Vesely
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Jim Vesely
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Lee Moriwaki
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Lee Moriwaki
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Joni Balter
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Eric Devericks
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Lance Dickie
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Bruce Ramsey
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Kate Riley
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Lynne Varner
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Lynne Varner
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Ryan Blethen
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October 27, 2004

Racial politics

Depending on the outcome of next Tuesday's election, African Americans as a voting bloc might be claiming victory or ducking blame. In 2000, President Bush received just 9 percent of African-American votes, which according to the Associated Press is the lowest percentage a Republican presidential candidate has received since Barry Goldwater ran against Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964.

But a new poll predicts Bush could pick up African American support this time around, possibly garnering as much as 18 percent of the black vote. The reason for the up tick? Black Christian conservatives who support Bush's faith-based initiatives and his opposition to same-sex marriage.

This is all interesting political fodder because while blacks tend to be solidly Democratic, their votes are key in battleground states.

And this headline pointing to the further segmentation of the American electorate: Kerry Leads Among Voters With Disabilities

A mid-August survey of a nationally representative sample of 1,012 adults found likely voters with disabilities say they will vote for Kerry over Bush (50 to 40 percent, with 7 percent for Nader).

In the 2000 election, the Harris Poll found that 56 percent of voters with disabilities cast ballots for Al Gore, and 38 percent for Bush

Respond to Lynne

Read her latest column

 
Posted by at October 27, 2004 02:49 PM



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