Link to jump to start of content The Seattle Times Company Jobs Autos Homes Rentals NWsource Classifieds seattletimes.com
The Seattle Times STOP: The Seattle Times Opinion Blog
Traffic | Weather | Your account Movies | Restaurants | Today's events



Welcome to STop, the Seattle Times Opinion blog where our editorial writers and editors share their evolving thoughts on a variety of issues. STop is a place where opinion writers and readers can exchange views and readers can learn more about how editorial positions are formed.

The opinions you read below are those of the individual writers, not necessarily views that will become formal positions of The Seattle Times. Respond to STop
(Please be aware that your name and comments may be published here, unless you specify otherwise).

Currently, STop cannot automatically post readers' comments on the blog. However, the editorial staff will regularly post readers' comments. Your comments are sent directly to the individual editor or writer.

space space space

Jim Vesely
space
Jim Vesely
E-mail | Bio


Lee Moriwaki
space
Lee Moriwaki
E-mail | Bio


Joni Balter
space
Joni Balter
E-mail | Bio


Eric Devericks
space
Eric Devericks
E-mail | Bio


Lance Dickie
space
Lance Dickie
E-mail | Bio


Bruce Ramsey
space
Bruce Ramsey
E-mail | Bio


Kate Riley
space
Kate Riley
E-mail | Bio


Lynne Varner
space
Lynne Varner
E-mail | Bio


Ryan Blethen
space
Ryan Blethen
E-mail | Bio


September 17, 2004

Refugee deported

On the front page of Friday's Seattle Times, a story about a Cambodian refugee being sent back to his homeland failed to muster any empathy from me.

Since Ho Beua came to the U.S. with his family as a teen, he has been in and out of jail. Today, the 38-year-old has served time for assault and DUI convictions. Now he is among 1,500 Cambodian criminal offenders across the nation being deported to their homeland.

While it is sad that the father of three is being sent back to a poor country that he no longer relates to and has little family in, it's also tough not to say, this is a guy who had a wonderful opportunity and chose to throw it away.

Yes, he seemed to have fallen through the cracks as a teen in the U.S. and this is indeed unfortunate. But to have repeatedly broken the law and now to expect empathy and a pardon doesn't wash.

We should save our empathy and court resources for those immigrants who work hard and appreciate the opportunity to live in the U.S.

Respond


 
Posted by Colleen Pohlig at September 17, 2004 11:36 AM



Marketplace

November 2005

S M T W T F S
    1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30