Link to jump to start of content The Seattle Times Company Jobs Autos Homes Rentals NWsource Classifieds seattletimes.com
The Seattle Times STOP: The Seattle Times Opinion Blog
Traffic | Weather | Your account Movies | Restaurants | Today's events



Welcome to STop, the Seattle Times Opinion blog where our editorial writers and editors share their evolving thoughts on a variety of issues. STop is a place where opinion writers and readers can exchange views and readers can learn more about how editorial positions are formed.

The opinions you read below are those of the individual writers, not necessarily views that will become formal positions of The Seattle Times. Respond to STop
(Please be aware that your name and comments may be published here, unless you specify otherwise).

Currently, STop cannot automatically post readers' comments on the blog. However, the editorial staff will regularly post readers' comments. Your comments are sent directly to the individual editor or writer.

space space space

Jim Vesely
space
Jim Vesely
E-mail | Bio


Lee Moriwaki
space
Lee Moriwaki
E-mail | Bio


Joni Balter
space
Joni Balter
E-mail | Bio


Eric Devericks
space
Eric Devericks
E-mail | Bio


Lance Dickie
space
Lance Dickie
E-mail | Bio


Bruce Ramsey
space
Bruce Ramsey
E-mail | Bio


Kate Riley
space
Kate Riley
E-mail | Bio


Lynne Varner
space
Lynne Varner
E-mail | Bio


Ryan Blethen
space
Ryan Blethen
E-mail | Bio


July 29, 2004

Seattle's racial tiebreaker

The Ninth Circuit ruling on racial preferences in admission to Seattle Schools is a fascinating piece of lawyering.

It is not an argument about Initiative 200, which forbids racial admissions in my view but not in the view of the politically correct majority of judges of the Washington Supreme Court. The case that came down Tuesday was ruled on 14th amendment grounds, "equal protection of the laws."

Judge Diarmuid O'Scannlain took Justice O'Connor's argument in the Michigan affirmative-action cases, which allowed racial preferences if they met a narrow set of standards, and showed how the Seattle Schools' program did not meet those standards. That is, it used the pro-preferences argument in the Michigan cases to defeat preferences in Seattle. I thought the Michigan cases were decided wrongly, and that governmental racial preferences for social-engineering reasons should be totally illegal all the time. But you take what you can get.

This case shows that preferences remain a live issue in American courts, which I find very encouraging.

Respond to this posting

 
Posted by Bruce Ramsey at July 29, 2004 11:44 AM



Marketplace

November 2005

S M T W T F S
    1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30