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Best Seat in the House

Photography, sports and life as seen through the lens of Seattle Times photographer Rod Mar.

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December 27, 2007 3:51 PM

Seahawks: Wrong Lens, Right Time.

Posted by Rod Mar

Home field advantage.

This was one of the themes of last Sunday's game between the Seahawks and the Baltimore Ravens.

Seattle had played miserably during a 13-10 loss last week in Carolina and was hoping to rebound in front of their home crowd.

During the second quarter, Baltimore found themselves deep in their own territory, and I started shooting with a 70-200mm lens in an effort to show a little more of the environment. Using a mid-range telephoto in this situation allowed me to see more of the stadium, but lessened visibility of the players, so it was a bit of a risk. If there was a touchdown the other direction or an interception or fumble, I'd be pretty helpless.

To add to to the visual impact, I also was lying on the field in the rain, trying to get the lowest angle possible.

Here's what I looked like through the lens of Associated Press photograher Ted Warren (and no, we're not having a caption contest for this one...):



(courtesy Ted Warren)

I was trying to frame the "Home of the 12th Man" sign with the players in the foreground:



(Canon EOS 1D Mark III, EF 70-200mm, f2.8 lens @ 135mm, ISO 1600, 1/1000 sec, f2.8)

And of course, while I'm trying to be all arty and stuff, an actual big play happens. Seattle's Patrick Kerney caused a fumble by Baltimore's Mike Anderson, and I'm so loose on the play that I only know something's happened by the roar of the crowd. Looking back later, I did have a shot of the fumble — it's so stunning in its focus, composition and sheer artistry that I'm sure it will be hung in a gallery somewhere someday. Or not:



(Canon EOS 1D Mark III, EF 70-200mm, f2.8 lens @ 180mm, ISO 1600, 1/1000 sec, f2.8)

Seattle's Leroy Hill recovers the ball and heads...get this...right towards me. Ah, the luck. I should have bought a lottery ticket. Here's how it looked:



(Canon EOS 1D Mark III, EF 70-200mm, f2.8 lens @ 160mm, ISO 1600, 1/1000 sec, f2.8)



(Canon EOS 1D Mark III, EF 70-200mm, f2.8 lens @ 145mm, ISO 1600, 1/1000 sec, f2.8)



(Canon EOS 1D Mark III, EF 70-200mm, f2.8 lens @ 115mm, ISO 1600, 1/1000 sec, f2.8)



(Canon EOS 1D Mark III, EF 70-200mm, f2.8 lens @ 110mm, ISO 1600, 1/1000 sec, f2.8 * this frame color corrected for print*)

I'd warned my assistant Jacob that I wanted a my camera with a wide-angle lens on it if anyone came towards us in the end zone on a touchdown, and as soon as I put down the 70-200mm, he was handing me the body with the 16-35mm. Hill raced right in front of us and a pileup ensued:



(Canon EOS 1D Mark IIN, EF 16-35mm lens @ 18mm, ISO 800, 1/640 sec, f2.8)



(Canon EOS 1D Mark IIN, EF 16-35mm lens @ 25mm, ISO 800, 1/640 sec, f2.8)



(Canon EOS 1D Mark IIN, EF 16-35mm lens @ 16mm, ISO 800, 1/640 sec, f2.8)



(Canon EOS 1D Mark IIN, EF 16-35mm lens @ 16mm, ISO 800, 1/640 sec, f2.8)

I guess the moral of the story is that I really don't know what the hell I'm doing much of the time. I plan and strategize and the time I have the "wrong" lens, I get the "right" picture. We chose to lead with the image that had the words "Welcome to Qwest Field" running across the top, so we got the big play and also tied in the theme of home field advantage. Lastly, if I wasn't lying down in the rain, the angle of the shot would have been different and the sign wouldn't have been in the frame at all.

Here's Monday's sports cover:




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December 25, 2007 1:45 PM

Happy Holidays...

Posted by Rod Mar




(Canon EOS 1D Mark III, EF 24-40mm lens @ 38mm, ISO 200, 1/8th sec. @ f11)

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December 22, 2007 12:39 AM

Sonics: Kevin Durant's Big Night

Posted by Rod Mar

Last night's Sonics game was only the second regular season game I've shot this year. Amazing how football can dominate an entire part of one's calendar.

So I was shaking off a bit of rust (and if you saw my photos from the UW men's basketball game earlier this week, you saw first hand how rusty I was). In trying to get back into the swing of basketball, my strategy was to just hammer on the motordrive as hard as I could.

1,000 frames, 2,000 frames, who cares? I figured, I can edit fast.

Correction: Hammering on the motordrive just leaves you with a bunch of crappy frames.

Live and learn, right?

One challenge was a 7:30 tipoff time, which is something the Sonics do on Friday nights, instead of their usual 7:00pm starts.

That 30 minute difference meant that I probably would be able to shoot one less quarter of the game than I usually do before having to edit and transmit.

And with the game slated as the centerpiece for Saturday's sports section, I not only had to make a picture, I had to actually make a pretty good one.

(Kidding. According to my boss, I'm supposed to make a pretty good one each time out. He's such a hard-ass).

Sonics rookie and superstar-in-the-making Kevin Durant gave me an early Christmas present in the first half when he drove along the left baseline and double-pumped his way through two Toronto defenders:



(Canon EOS 1D Mark III, EF 70-200mm/f2.8 lens @ 70mm, ISO 1600, 1/500 sec., f2.8)

I figured he owed me that one since he'd also had two high-flying dunks that came from my side of the hoop, meaning I was shooting him from behind.

Durant caught fire in the second half, and finished with a game-high 27 points. I caught a good expression after he nailed his final three-pointer of the night:



(Canon EOS 1D Mark III, EF 70-200mm/f2.8 lens @ 155mm, ISO 1600, 1/500 sec., f2.8)

My other decent frame of the night came courtesy of Seattle's Wally Szczerbiak, who was grabbed by Toronto's Carlos Delfino:



(Canon EOS 1D Mark III, EF 24-70mm/f2.8 lens @ 38mm, ISO 1600, 1/500 sec., f2.8)

I moved two versions, and I'm pretty sure the tighter one has more impact:



(Canon EOS 1D Mark III, EF 24-70mm/f2.8 lens @ 38mm, ISO 1600, 1/500 sec., f2.8)

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December 20, 2007 11:57 PM

Seahawks and Yoga: It's Getting Hot in Herre...

Posted by Rod Mar

"It's getting hot in herre...so take of all your clothes..."
-- Nelly

I feel ya, Nelly. No, I REALLY feel ya.

Because when you're taking photos of "Hot Yoga", it gets hot in "therre".

How hot?

Try upwards of 105 degrees.

So hot you could fry an egg on a yoga mat.

Hotter than Scarlett Johanssen (take that, Jerry Brewer!).

So hot that my cameras immediately fogged up upon entering the studio (I had to wait over 30 minutes for them to acclimate).

Why was I there? My assignment was to photograph Seahawks linebacker Kevin Bentley, who does hot yoga once a week during the season as a way to recover his muscles and also increase his flexibility.

Of course, the day I was shooting was also the day of the heavy rains and flooding a couple of weeks ago, so I was dressed in jeans. Perfect clothing in which to stand for an hour in a virtual sauna.

Our terrific NFL writer Danny O'Neill was writing an interesting piece on how various players try to recover from a game and to prepare their bodies for the next week's contest. Some watch tv and play video games. Others, like Patrick Kerney, use a hyperbaric chamber.

But Bentley fell in love with hot yoga, and is convinced it pays off. Watching him, it was hard to argue anything but.

For a man listed as 6-0, 238 pounds, he's got balance and flexibility to spare. He's worked at it for months, and although he's fairly lithe for his size, he admits he has nowhere the yoga strength and flexibility that most of the others (predominantly young women) possess.

Here are some pictures I managed to make after defogging my equipment and wiping the sweat pouring down my face:



(Canon EOS 1D Mark III, EF 16-35mm/f2.8 lens @ 16mm, ISO 3200, 1/60th sec, f2.8)



(Canon EOS 1D Mark III, EF 16-35mm/f2.8 lens @ 16mm, ISO 3200, 1/60th sec, f2.8)



(Canon EOS 1D Mark III, EF 16-35mm/f2.8 lens @ 24mm, ISO 3200, 1/60th sec, f2.8)

And Patrick Kerney's hyperbaric chamber? Here's what it looks like. But be warned, if you want your own, you'll need a prescription from a doctor. He spends hours zipped up in this oversized, pressurized duffle bag, reading books and listening to his iPod. And no, Kerney's not claustrophobic:



(Canon EOS 1D Mark III, EF 16-35mm/f2.8 lens @ 17mm, ISO 640, 1/60th sec, f4.0)



(Canon EOS 1D Mark III, EF 16-35mm/f2.8 lens @ 16mm, ISO 640, 1/60th sec, f4.0)

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December 16, 2007 8:37 PM

Seahawks: You'll Punt Your Eye Out, Kid!

Posted by Rod Mar

Okay, I just got through photographing one of the most boring football games I've ever attended.

Certainly not boring in terms of Carolina players or fans, for whom the 13-10 victory over Seattle was a bright spot in an otherwise disappointing season.

And not boring for the Seahawks, who hit a speed bump in an otherwise good stretch of wins. Head coach Mike Holmgren made clear his team will NOT be bored as they practice this week for next Sunday's game at home against the Baltimore Ravens.

But certainly boring in terms of photographs, which is my only concern on game day. Don't care who wins, who loses, who plays well, who sucks. Not unless any of the above has anything to do with good photos.

How boring was it?

Here's a rundown of how each team's offensive drives ended in the first half:

Seattle:

— punt

— punt

— punt

— punt

— punt

— punt

Carolina:

— punt

— missed field goal

— punt

— punt

— punt

— punt

I'm sure any of you who started watching the game on television turned it off before halftime. If you didn't, you need therapy. Alternately, isn't this the time of year that "A Christmas Story" plays over and over on TNT? That's way better than this football game was in terms of entertainment.

"You'll punt your eye out, kid..."

Unless you like looking at a sports section full of punting pictures (and let me tell you, mine are special...), you can conclude that I was one frustrated shooter at halftime.

I tried to not get too stressed, telling myself, "it's an NFL game so something exciting will happen".

Something would happen, right?

Nothing did. The third quarter wasn't any better. Only Ryan Plackemeier's mother could be happy with this punt-fest.

In fact, the game turned on one play, but that play didn't happen until there was only 1:44 left in the game. And while the play was devastating for the Seahawks, it worked out okay for me.

It almost didn't. When Carolina's Thomas Davis knocked the ball from the hand of Seattle quarterback Matt Hasselbeck, setting off a mad chase that resulted in the Panthers' Richard Marshall recovering it, I was...completely blocked.

Seattle has been so good in the two-minute drill that I was confident they'd move the ball down the field, even though I didn't know if they would score. Accordingly, I positioned myself on the Seattle sideline, downfield on the other end of the bench area. This way I was covered in case the Seahawks got into scoring territory, and I would have some shot if there was a fumble or interception.

I apparently might have been wrong on that last assumption.

For when "the Big Play" happened, I was 40 yards downfield looking at this:



(Canon EOS 1D Mark IIN, EF 400mm/f2.8 lens, ISO 800, 1/1000 sec, f4.0)

Yes, that's the head of quarterback Matt Hasselbeck peeking through those big linemen. I hear the crowd and sense the turnover, but all I see is Hasselbeck trying to find the ball:


(Canon EOS 1D Mark IIN, EF 400mm/f2.8 lens, ISO 800, 1/1000 sec, f4.0)

Good stuff, eh?



(Canon EOS 1D Mark IIN, EF 400mm/f2.8 lens, ISO 800, 1/1000 sec, f4.0)

Simply award winning. Someone call the Pulitzer committee!

And then, the dreaded "ref's butt" steps in and I get these two prize-winning frames in the middle of the ONLY significant play of the game. I actually have more than one frame of his rear, but I think you get the idea:



(Canon EOS 1D Mark IIN, EF 400mm/f2.8 lens, ISO 800, 1/1000 sec, f4.0)

Luckily for me, as the Panthers celebrate, Hasselbeck turns and holds his hands to his helmet for what seems like an eternity (and trust me, when you have NO pictures to show for your day with only two minutes left in the game, it does seem like forever):



(Canon EOS 1D Mark IIN, EF 400mm/f2.8 lens, ISO 800, 1/1000 sec, f4.0)

I also cropped a version of another frame that we decided was a better frame because it was more immediate and cleaner:



(Canon EOS 1D Mark IIN, EF 400mm/f2.8 lens, ISO 800, 1/1000 sec, f4.0)

It was a weird and boring game that lacked any significant action or photos for 58 minutes and 16 seconds before we had a chance to make a good picture.

I wish I had a shot of the actual fumble, but I think the shot of Hasselbeck sums up their day pretty well.

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December 14, 2007 10:52 AM

Prep Sports: Using the Mark III Indoors

Posted by Rod Mar

Got a chance to use the Canon EOS 1D Mark III in a dark high school gym.

Seattle Prep visited Rainier Beach, which as one of your typically dim high school gyms.

Using the older Mark II, I could shoot at ISO 1000 without the digital noise (pixelation) blowing up. But staying down at ISO 1000 also meant my max shutter speed was about 1/250 sec, which is often too slow to capture fast moving action.

But I learned during the high school football season that I could dial up the ISO on the Mark III to ISO 3200 and still have an acceptable image.

Obviously lighting the gym would be the best scenario, but I wanted to see what the Mark III could do, so I shot at ISO 3200, 1/400 sec., f2.8. I know that math doesn't add up, but as I've stated here before, the Mark III seems to be a "darker" camera than the Mark IIN.

In other words, the one could shoot at a lower exposure with the Mark IIN. This in a way negates part of the allure that shooting ISO 3200 on the Mark III provides, since their respective exposure levels seem to be different.

Blah, blah, blah. Here are some samples. They have been slightly corrected for exposure and tone, but not noise-reduction. It's very passable for newsprint:



(Canon EOS 1D Mark III, EF 300mm/f2.8 lens, ISO 3200, 1/400 sec., f2.8)



(Canon EOS 1D Mark III, EF 300mm/f2.8 lens, ISO 3200, 1/400 sec., f2.8)



(Canon EOS 1D Mark III, EF 300mm/f2.8 lens, ISO 3200, 1/400 sec., f2.8)

Lots of folks have been asking me about the performance of the Mark III's vs. the Mark II's, and I'll address them soon, I promise.

Thanks for reading.

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December 12, 2007 9:24 AM

Seahawks: Who's the Man?

Posted by Rod Mar

Shoot pictures that tell stories, blah, blah, blah.

I've addressed that theme on this blog so many times that I'm sure many of you tune out when you see the words.

Last week, I wrote about Lofa Tatupu's three interception game, and how that was the big story of the day.

But by the end of last Sunday's game between the Seahawks and the visiting Arizona Cardinals, I found myself with too many choices.

Pregame thoughts:

— a win by the Seahawks clinches the NFC West for them, and assures a home playoff game. Obviously this was the overriding theme for the day.

— the next rushing touchdown by running back Shaun Alexander would be the 100th of his career.

— I hope it snows. Snow makes cool photos.

Well, it's good to be somewhat prepared, but by halftime, I'd decided that quarterback Matt Hasselbeck would be the story. He'd thrown three touchdown passes to help the Seahawks to a 27-7 lead at halftime.

It wasn't of Hasselbeck, but I liked this wide-angle shot of Nate Burleson after he scored the first touchdown of the game on a seven-yard reception:



(Canon EOS 1D Mark IIN, EF 16-35mm/f2.8 lens @ 35mm, ISO 1000, 1/500 sec.,f2.8)

As we headed towards the field for the start of the third quarter, I told my assistant that if Hasselbeck was going to be the big story of the game, then I would have to make a "special" image of him.

I know what you're thinking: "Aren't all your cover photos supposed to be special?"

True that.

But if you think about it, photographs of quarterbacks all fall into a couple of categories, making it hard to find one that's visually compelling enough to hold the cover.

Here's a brief list:

— quarterback using hand and arms to audible (ala Indy's Peyton Manning, who flaps his arms so much one expects him to take flight). Really, what does that photo tell you about the game?

— quarterback throwing. Snooze.

— quarterback throwing through a sea of players, as viewed from the receiver's point-of-view. This one has the most promise.

So I decided to fight every photographer's instinct, and forget about where the ball was being thrown on each Hasselbeck pass. If a receiver made a juggling, one-handed catch while upside-down and a defender draped all over him, I'd just have to miss it.

(Who are we kidding? I probably would have missed something that cool anyway).

Instead, I added a 1.4x teleconverter to my 400mm lens, and shot tighter on Hasselbeck from downfield, looking back towards him. I was hoping to get the receiver's point of view, but have the lens tight enough on him to create something "different".

The results were...boring. I'll spare you the images.

Following that, I shortened the lens by removing the extender, and whenever the Seahawks got within scoring range, I kept my focus on Hasselbeck. My hope was that he would celebrate in some way.

Well, he kinda celebrated. Gave it a little fist pump. For all of Matt's idolization of Green Bay's Brett Favre, he should take a lesson from the Favre and raise his arms up and leap around with a great big smile. Clearly not Matt's style:



(Canon EOS 1D Mark III, EF 400mm/f2.8 lens, ISO 1600, 1/800 sec.,f2.8)

Heck, I got a better reaction from Hasselbeck after he missed Deion Branch over the middle. At least he showed some emotion:



(Canon EOS 1D Mark III, EF 400mm/f2.8 lens, ISO 1600, 1/800 sec.,f2.8)

While I was doing all of this Hasselbeck stalking when the Seahawks had the ball, defensive end Patrick Kerney was wreaking havoc gimpy old Kurt Warner, the Arizona quarterback. In fact, he tallied three sacks, and I realized he was now in the running for my little "player of the game" contest.

Kerney would sack the guy, then grimace, yell, strike a b-boy pose, and then yell some more. He really was a 6'5", 272 lb, walking, talking, sacking, spitting, yelling photo op:



(Canon EOS 1D Mark III, EF 400mm/f2.8 lens, ISO 1600, 1/800 sec.,f2.8)


(Canon EOS 1D Mark III, EF 400mm/f2.8 lens, ISO 1600, 1/800 sec.,f2.8)



(Canon EOS 1D Mark III, EF 400mm/f2.8 lens, ISO 1600, 1/800 sec.,f2.8)

And then to make matters even more complicated, cornerback Marcus Trufant picked off a pass and returned it 84-yards for a touchdown. If a play like that wasn't game-defining enough, I realized it was Trufant's third interception of the day. And hell, if Lofa Tatupu was last week's stud for his three picks, then Trufant was the third candidate in my player of the day race.

I was shooting along the Seahawks sideline when Trufant made his interception. Since the players were blocking my view downfield, I actually saw him make the interception while watching the big-screen at the south end of the stadium. It's a trick I've learned from watching NFL and college players who on breakaway runs will look up at the video boards to see how close their pursuers are.

Upon seeing the interception and watching him break a couple of tackles and hearing the crowd roar, I realized he might take it all the way down the sideline. I grabbed for a camera with my 70-200mm lens (I only had an instant to decide — 70-200mm or 16-35mm? I chose the 70-200mm lens in case he broke towards the middle of the field. Sure enough, within seconds, Trufant was racing by us. I got a lucky photo of him eluding the final Arizona pursuer, whose eyes really make the photo. I was bummed, though, that I cut off Trufant's feet:



(Canon EOS 1D Mark III, EF 70-200mm/f2.8 lens @ 70mm, ISO 1600, 1/800 sec.,f2.8)

Armed with my compact flash cards full of riches (really, how often to I get to choose from three different story lines?), I decided on a post-game strategy. Since I knew I had compelling images of both Kerney and Trufant, I would stalk, I mean focus on, Hasselbeck.

Just before game's end, I made my way along the Seattle bench for the obligatory "NFC West Champs" photos.

Shaun Alexander held up four fingers:



(Canon EOS 1D Mark IIN, EF 16-35mm/f2.8 lens @ 32mm, ISO 1000, 1/500 sec.,f2.8)

Patrick Kerney donned a t-shirt declaring them division champs:



(Canon EOS 1D Mark IIN, EF 16-35mm/f2.8 lens @ 28mm, ISO 1000, 1/500 sec.,f2.8)

Marcus Trufant barked at the crowd:



(Canon EOS 1D Mark IIN, EF 16-35mm/f2.8 lens @ 35mm, ISO 1000, 1/500 sec.,f2.8)
As the clock ran out, I just focused on Hasselbeck.

His brother Tim plays for Arizona, and his dad Don, was there as well. Here's the three of them:



(Canon EOS 1D Mark IIN, EF 16-35mm/f2.8 lens @ 24mm, ISO 1000, 1/500 sec.,f2.8)

Matt turned and blew kisses into the stands. I later learned this he was looking where his family was sitting:



(Canon EOS 1D Mark IIN, EF 16-35mm/f2.8 lens @ 16mm, ISO 1000, 1/500 sec.,f2.8)

Matt, Patrick, Marcus. Three guys, three huge games.

Made my Sunday an easy one, even though it didn't snow.


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December 7, 2007 8:08 AM

Santa's Jump Starting the Holidays.

Posted by Rod Mar

As a jaded photojournalist, I tend to have a very skeptical eye about scenes like the one I'm about to show you.

We are often on the lookout for feature-type photos that can run in the paper without an accompanying story.

In fact our photo editors demand them.

These are needed because we run a lot of stories that don't have photographs, and this allows us to have visual elements on pages that otherwise would turn really gray with printed word after printed word.

So I'm walking out of an assignment in Kirkland and the woman I'm talking with stops, points and says, "hey, now THAT'S a great photo!"

Sure enough I look ahead and see something that makes for a great feature photo. It's unusual, visual, timely and fun.

It's so good that I look around to make sure someone's not filming a commercial or video or it's not another photo shoot.

Seems real enough so I hustle a camera up to my eye and catch ol' Santa giving a motorist some help in a mall parking lot:



(Canon EOS 1D Mark III, EF 70-200mm lens @ 130mm, ISO 400, 1/250th sec, f5.0)

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December 3, 2007 8:27 AM

Seahawks: Deja Vu All Over Again

Posted by Rod Mar

When Seahawks linebacker Lofa Tatupu intercepted an A.J. Feeley pass over the middle in last Sunday's game between Seattle and Philadelphia, I did more than sigh with relief that I'd gotten a decent shot of the play.

I turned to my assistant Mike and remarked, "Wow, that was weird. Two years ago here, Tatupu intercepted a pass here when the Seahawks blew out the Eagles on Monday Night football. I remember it. It was snowing like hell, and he returned it for a touchdown".

Although Tatupu didn't score on this year's interception, he did himself one better (okay, TWO better), by picking off THREE passes to lead Seattle to another win at Lincoln Financial Field.

Of course, the writers made a big deal of his last big game in Philly, too. So when I got back to Seattle, I dug around in my archives. Looking at photos from that game in 2005 showed some remarkable similarities.

First off, last Sunday's game was played almost exactly two years ago to the date. On December 5, 2005, Seattle defeated Philly 42-0 in a heavy snowstorm on Monday Night Football:



(Canon EOS 1D Mark II, EF 70-200mm lens, ISO 1000, 1/500 sec, f2.8)

In that game, Tatupu, then in his second year as a pro, picked off a pass in the second quarter and returned it for a touchdown.

2005:



(Canon EOS 1D Mark II, EF 400mm lens, ISO 1000, 1/500 sec, f2.8)

Fast forward to last Sunday, when before fans were even settled into their seats, Tatupu had picked off an A.J. Feeley pass over the middle.

2007:



(Canon EOS 1D Mark III, EF 400mm/f2.8 lens, ISO 1600, 1/800 sec., f2.8)

Even my photos of the runback are similar.

2005:



(Canon EOS 1D Mark II, EF 400mm lens, ISO 1000, 1/500 sec, f2.8)

2007:

>

(Canon EOS 1D Mark III, EF 400mm/f2.8 lens, ISO 1600, 1/800 sec., f2.8)

Of course one big difference is that in 2005, Tatupu managed to find the end zone for a touchdown, marked by his salute to Philadelphia's favorite son Rocky Balboa. Upon reaching the end zone, Tatupu used the padding on the goal post as a punching bag:

2005:



(Canon EOS 1D Mark II, EF 70-200mm lens, ISO 1000, 1/500 sec, f2.8)

This year's game was not a blowout, and the Seahawks escaped with a taut 28-24 win only after Tatupu's third interception of the day. He celebrated after the game with head coach Mike Holmgren:

2007:



(Canon EOS 1D Mark IIN, EF 16-35mm lens, ISO 1000, 1/500 sec, f2.8)

The Seahawks and their fans hope there will be one other similarity to the 2005 season — that's the year they advanced to the Super Bowl.

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Recent entries

Dec 27, 07 - 03:51 PM
Seahawks: Wrong Lens, Right Time.

Dec 25, 07 - 01:45 PM
Happy Holidays...

Dec 22, 07 - 12:39 AM
Sonics: Kevin Durant's Big Night

Dec 20, 07 - 11:57 PM
Seahawks and Yoga: It's Getting Hot in Herre...

Dec 16, 07 - 08:37 PM
Seahawks: You'll Punt Your Eye Out, Kid!

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